Netskope es nombrado líder en el Cuadrante Mágico™ de Gartner 2022 para Security Service Edge. Obtenga el informe

  • Productos

    Los productos de Netskope se basan en Netskope Security Cloud.

  • Plataforma

    Visibilidad inigualable y protección contra amenazas y datos en tiempo real en la nube privada de seguridad más grande del mundo.

Netskope ha sido nombrado Líder en el Informe del Cuadrante Mágico de Gartner™ 2022 en SSE

Obtenga el informe Todos los productos
Líder SSE Netskope gartner mq 2022

Netskope ofrece una estrategia de seguridad cloud moderna, con capacidades unificadas para los datos y protección frente a amenazas, además de un acceso privado seguro.

Explora nuestra plataforma
Vista aérea de una ciudad metropolitana

Cambie a los servicios de seguridad en la nube líderes del mercado con una latencia mínima y una alta fiabilidad.

Más información
Lighted highway through mountainside switchbacks

Prevenga las amenazas que a menudo eluden otras soluciones de seguridad utilizando un marco SSE de un solo paso.

Más información
Lighting storm over metropolitan area

Soluciones de confianza cero para implementaciones de SSE y SASE

Más información
Boat driving through open sea

Netskope hace posible un proceso seguro, rápido y con inteligencia cloud para la adopción de los servicios en la nube, las aplicaciones y la infraestructura de nube pública.

Más información
Wind turbines along cliffside
  • Nuestros clientes

    Netskope da servicio a más de 2.000 clientes en todo el mundo, entre los que se encuentran más de 25 de las 100 empresas de Fortune

  • Customer Solutions

    We are here for you and with you every step of the way, ensuring your success with Netskope.

  • Formación y certificación

    La formación de Netskope le ayudará a convertirse en un experto en seguridad en la nube.

Ayudamos a nuestros clientes a estar preparados para cualquier situación

Ver nuestros clientes
Woman smiling with glasses looking out window

El talentoso y experimentado equipo de servicios profesionales de Netskope proporciona un enfoque prescriptivo para su exitosa implementación.

Más información
Netskope Professional Services

Asegure su viaje de transformación digital y aproveche al máximo sus aplicaciones en la nube, web y privadas con la capacitación de Netskope.

Más información
Group of young professionals working
  • Recursos

    Obtenga más información sobre cómo Netskope puede ayudarle a proteger su viaje hacia la nube.

  • Blog

    Descubra cómo Netskope permite la transformación de la seguridad y las redes a través del servicio de seguridad (SSE).

  • Eventos & Workshops

    Manténgase a la vanguardia de las últimas tendencias de seguridad y conéctese con sus pares.

  • Security Defined

    Todo lo que necesitas saber en nuestra enciclopedia de ciberseguridad.

Podcast Security Visionaries

Episode 14: Enabling Security from the Top-Down

Reproducir el pódcast
Black man sitting in conference meeting

Lea lo último sobre cómo Netskope puede hacer posible el viaje de confianza cero y SASE a través de las capacidades de SSE.

Lea el blog
Sunrise and cloudy sky

Semana SASE

Netskope puede ayudarle a dar los primeros pasos en el mundo SASE y a descubrir qué papel desempeñan en él la seguridad, las conexiones de red y Zero Trust.

Más información
Semana SASE

¿Qué es Security Service Edge (SSE)?

Explore el lado de la seguridad de SASE, el futuro de la red y la protección en la nube.

Más información
Four-way roundabout
  • Empresa

    Le ayudamos a mantenerse a la vanguardia de los desafíos de seguridad de la nube, los datos y la red.

  • Por qué Netskope

    La transformación de la nube y el trabajo desde cualquier lugar han cambiado la forma en que debe funcionar la seguridad.

  • Liderazgo

    Nuestro equipo de liderazgo está firmemente comprometido a hacer todo lo necesario para que nuestros clientes tengan éxito.

  • Partners

    Nos asociamos con líderes en seguridad para ayudarlo a asegurar su viaje a la nube.

Netskope posibilita el futuro del trabajo.

Descubra más
Curvy road through wooded area

Netskope está redefiniendo la seguridad de la nube, los datos y la red para ayudar a las organizaciones a aplicar los principios de Zero Trust para proteger los datos.

Más información
Switchback road atop a cliffside

Pensadores, constructores, soñadores, innovadores. Juntos, ofrecemos soluciones de seguridad en la nube de vanguardia para ayudar a nuestros clientes a proteger sus datos y usuarios.

Conozca a nuestro equipo
Group of hikers scaling a snowy mountain

La estrategia de venta centrada en el partner de Netskope permite a nuestros canales maximizar su expansión y rentabilidad y, al mismo tiempo, transformar la seguridad de su empresa.

Más información
Group of diverse young professionals smiling

Making Sense of Zero Trust Through the Lens of Networking and Infrastructure

Oct 20 2022

“Zero trust” still confuses people—and for good reason. While the term conveys a certain absolute authority (“zero,” “nope,” “nothing”), contemporary approaches offer much more nuanced capabilities. And while zero trust today is typically associated with security initiatives, the concepts have their origin in the definition of network perimeters, who is granted access, and how that access is provided.

The evolution of security hasn’t been from implicit trust to no trust, but rather toward contextual controls that grant the right people the right access to the right resources at the right time for the right reasons. But ultimately, making sense of zero trust requires an understanding of how the role of networking and infrastructure has shifted with respect to the critical objectives of security in recent years.

The changing role of the network: a brief history

In the earliest days of building networks and defining the enterprise perimeter, all companies were essentially islands. They built corporate networks to facilitate interactions between employees and data that was all on-premises. When the internet came along, everyone wanted to get in on that. But businesses realized fairly quickly that the internet’s default implicit trust was going to cause problems when it came to protecting themselves from outsiders with malicious intent. 

The first natural step was to use the network to create demarcation points. Architectures evolved to include something called a DMZ, which has a similar function as physical-world demilitarized zones (such as the 2.5-mile wide strip of land between North Korea and South Korea; the natural isolation of which created an involuntary park now regarded as one of the most well-preserved areas of temperate habitat in the world). This kind of “castle and moat” architecture actually worked for a long time. But then as businesses evolved and required constant connectivity with other businesses, partners, suppliers, and even their own customers in certain circumstances—new patterns were required 

There were many attempts at creating these new patterns over the years. The Jericho Forum promoted de-perimeterization in the early 2000s. A few years later, I wrote about “the death of the DMZ” and delivered some Microsoft TechEd presentations where I advocated to authenticate every person and system, authorize all actions and behaviors, audit every activity and transaction, and encrypt where necessary. (Though today, I would change that last one to encrypt all the time.)

Then zero trust networking came along. This was useful—but it was still thinking more along the lines of gating access to networks. Google’s BeyondCorp initiative proposed “What if people were always on the internet, even if they’re in the office?” They really only get an internet connection; all requests to interact with applications must flow through some kind of a broker. Then Forrester’s Zero Trust eXtended (ZTX) came along. Gartner offered their own early take on the concept, which was called CARTA  (continuous adaptive risk and trust assessment). 

Then the emergence of the software-defined perimeter architecture made the zero trust concept much more relevant. The software-defined perimeter hooked people to applications—regardless of what the underlying network infrastructure was like. This opened up new possibilities. 
As a result, the zero trust network access (ZTNA) market soon emerged. Right now, we’re seeing a lot of emphasis on ZTNA—which came out of COVID, when everyone suddenly had to work from home. While most enterprises initially tried to expand their VPN to cope with this immediate shift, what they found was that their VPN concentrators were brittle. They hadn’t been updated or patched in a while which meant they could be vulnerable. But even if companies could safely expand their VPN concentration capabilities, they were still running up against bandwidth constraints from backhauling traffic to their facilities for security. And it was especially inefficient because most of that traffic needed to hairpin right back out again to software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications or the web.

Letting the network do what it does best

ZTNA transcended the constraints of VPNs. I was wrong in 2019 when I said that ZTNA would replace VPN. I changed my view in 2020 to say ZTNA would augment VPN because there are still legitimate reasons when someone needs a VPN to access the network (such as for network administration or when doing performance analysis). But for the vast majority of cases, you don’t need to be on the network—you just need access to an application. ZTNA gives you that access without any sort of reliance on the underlying network architecture. 

This uncoupling (and unburdening) meant that networkers didn’t need to concern themselves with individual access control policies for applications. The application owner creates policies and defines who’s allowed to interact, as well as the conditions that indicate the level of access (e.g., full, reduced, isolated, none). That responsibility no longer has to be dumped on the networker—who may not be equipped to make those decisions for applications anyway. 

Simultaneously, networkers could now focus more on the things they do really well—such as high availability, ensuring that the network is reliable, and that it performs well at getting bits where they need to go. In addition, the network team can also help application owners ensure more consistent experiences. People interact with applications in exactly the same way, wherever they happen to be—in the office, in a coffee shop, on an airplane, or at home. 

The curious case of IoT discovery

Let’s ponder the Internet of Things (IoT) for a moment. If a company claims to have solved the problem of discovering all their IoT devices, I would argue that’s a claim of ignorance. Most companies possess a limited understanding of the IoT devices in their networks today. Poor visibility is the root—and the roots plunge far.

Beyond finding all those devices, effective visibility requires figuring out what they’re talking to and what is talking back. While this is a very natural thing for networkers to do, finding an IoT device’s owner can be very difficult. IoT devices are like rabbits—they multiply and then they forget their parentage. The traditional way of managing IoT devices (shuttling them onto their own subnet) offers no respite. While an application owner may only have one or two applications in their charge, people who manage IoT devices may have thousands. Once deployed, they often lose track of at least some of them. Who becomes responsible for their stewardship? 

If there were a way for a networker to automatically (re)discover all IoT devices and especially the communication flows between them, then we could assign them into different classifications with corresponding levels of required protection. Networkers could propose if an IoT device is “safe” or “risky” (or maybe even define a spectrum of different control classes between “safe” and “risky”).

One goal: the network is the security

Security teams don’t want to worry about connectivity details and networkers don’t want to worry about security policies. So by teasing these apart and allowing each domain to concentrate on their specialized tasks, each team can help the other succeed without stepping on any toes. 

Security should be helping networkers deliver ubiquity, resilience, and performance. In the worst case scenario, if teams misjudge the access and performance aspects, then the risk of people bypassing security controls looms large. And even in the best case, siloed security is a bottleneck that impedes the business, decreases IT agility, and reduces productivity and responsiveness to customers. ZTNA services facilitate network and security convergence, as do tools like digital experience management (DEM) which make it easier to troubleshoot problems and ensure that their users are kept safe while enjoying a superior experience. DEM reduces the time it takes to diagnose and close a helpdesk ticket, streamlining security and networking operations. 

The ultimate goal is for security to focus on controls, networking to focus on experience—and for everyone across the company to stay safe, happy, and productive.

author image
Steve Riley
Steve Riley es CTO de campo en Netskope. Habiendo trabajado en la intersección de la nube y la seguridad durante casi todo el tiempo que esto ha sido un tema a tratar, Steve ofrece esa perspectiva a las intervenciones de campo y ejecutivas, y también apoya la estrategia tecnológica a largo plazo y trabaja con los principales influenciadores de la industria. Steve ha desempeñado funciones tecnológicas durante más de tres décadas, incluyendo periodos trabajando en Gartner Inc, Riverbed Technology, Amazon Web Services y Microsoft Corp.